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  • Writer's pictureRafia Shabbir

8 Tips to Write Effective Learning Objectives Using Bloom's Taxonomy

Updated: May 11



Learning objectives are an essential component of any effective teaching strategy. By clearly defining what students are expected to learn, teachers can better plan and deliver lessons that help students achieve their learning goals. Bloom's Taxonomy is a widely used framework for designing and assessing learning objectives. In this article, we will provide you with seven tips for writing effective learning objectives using Bloom's Taxonomy. We will also provide real-world examples to illustrate how these tips can be applied in practice.


Read our article: Bloom's Taxonomy Made Simple: 10 Practical Strategies for Teachers


Tip 1: Begin with Action Verbs

One of the key elements of a well-written learning objective is the use of action verbs. Action verbs describe what students will be able to do as a result of the learning experience. When writing learning objectives, it is essential to use action verbs that are specific and measurable. This helps ensure that the learning objectives are clear and that progress towards them can be easily assessed.


For example, instead of writing a learning objective that says "Students will understand the concept of gravity," you could write "Students will be able to explain the concept of gravity." By using the action verb "explain," you have created a more specific and measurable learning objective.

Read our article: Bloom's Taxonomy Made Simple: 10 Practical Strategies for Teachers




Tip 2: Align Learning Objectives with Bloom's Taxonomy

Bloom's Taxonomy provides a framework for categorizing educational goals and objectives. It consists of six levels of learning, ranging from simple recall of information to more complex tasks such as analysis and evaluation. When writing learning objectives, it is important to align them with the appropriate level of Bloom's Taxonomy. This ensures that the learning objectives are appropriately challenging and that they help students develop the necessary skills and knowledge.


For example, if your learning objective is to teach students about the causes of the American Revolution, you could align it with Bloom's Taxonomy by using the level of "analyze." A more specific and measurable learning objective might be "Students will be able to analyze the causes of the American Revolution and identify the key factors that contributed to the conflict."


Read our article: Bloom's Taxonomy Made Simple: 10 Practical Strategies for Teachers


Tip 3: Be Specific and Measurable

Learning objectives should be specific and measurable. This means that they should clearly state what students are expected to learn and how their progress towards that goal will be assessed. Specific learning objectives are easier for both teachers and students to understand and help ensure that everyone is working towards the same goal.


For example, instead of writing a learning objective that says "Students will learn about the Civil War," you could write "Students will be able to describe the key events and battles of the Civil War and explain their significance." This learning objective is more specific and measurable, making it easier for teachers to assess students' progress.




Tip 4: Focus on the Learning, Not the Activity

When writing learning objectives, it is important to focus on the learning that is taking place, rather than the activity that is being used to teach it. This ensures that the learning objectives are relevant and meaningful to students, regardless of the teaching method that is being used.


Read our article: Bloom's Taxonomy Made Simple: 10 Practical Strategies for Teachers


For example, instead of writing a learning objective that says "Students will complete a worksheet on the parts of speech," you could write "Students will be able to identify and correctly use the eight parts of speech in written and oral communication." This learning objective focuses on the learning that is taking place (identifying and


Tip #5: Use clear and concise language

When writing learning objectives, it's important to use language that is clear and concise. Avoid using overly complex terms or technical jargon that may confuse learners. Instead, use simple and easy-to-understand language that clearly communicates the intended outcome of the learning activity.


For example, instead of saying "students will synthesize various sources to produce an original research paper," you could say "students will create a research paper using multiple sources."


Using clear and concise language not only makes the learning objective easier to understand, but it also makes it easier for learners to remember and apply the knowledge or skills they have acquired.




Tip #6: Align objectives with assessment methods

Effective learning objectives should align with the methods used to assess learners' knowledge or skills. This means that the objectives should clearly state what learners are expected to know or be able to do, and the assessment method should measure whether or not learners have met these objectives.


Read our article: Bloom's Taxonomy Made Simple: 10 Practical Strategies for Teachers


For example, if the learning objective is for students to be able to solve math problems using algebraic equations, the assessment method should involve solving similar math problems using algebraic equations. This ensures that the learning objective is being effectively assessed, and that learners are being given the opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of the objective.




Tip #7: Revise and refine objectives as needed

Finally, it's important to remember that learning objectives are not set in stone. As you implement them in the classroom and assess learner progress, you may find that certain objectives are too broad or too narrow, or that they need to be revised to better align with your instructional goals.

Don't be afraid to revise and refine your learning objectives as needed. This process may involve seeking feedback from learners or colleagues, analyzing assessment results, or simply reflecting on the effectiveness of the objectives in achieving the intended learning outcomes.




Tip #8: Start with Higher Order Thinking Skills

One of the key principles of Bloom's Taxonomy is the idea of moving from lower order thinking skills (LOTS) to higher order thinking skills (HOTS). This means that as educators, we should be encouraging students to engage in increasingly complex cognitive tasks. When it comes to writing effective learning objectives, starting with HOTS can be a great way to challenge students and ensure that they are truly mastering the material.


For example, instead of simply asking students to "define" a term, you could ask them to "evaluate" or "analyze" the concept in question. This type of language encourages students to engage in critical thinking and problem-solving, which are essential skills for success both inside and outside of the classroom.


Read our article: Bloom's Taxonomy Made Simple: 10 Practical Strategies for Teachers

Conclusion

Writing effective learning objectives is an essential part of designing successful educational programs and instructional activities. By following these 7 tips and using Bloom's Taxonomy as a guide, educators can create objectives that clearly communicate the intended outcomes of the learning activity and align with assessment methods.


Remember to use clear and concise language, consider the level of complexity of the learning objective, and revise and refine as necessary. With these tips in mind, you'll be well on your way to creating learning objectives that promote meaningful and lasting learning outcomes for your students.


Read our article: Bloom's Taxonomy Made Simple: 10 Practical Strategies for Teachers



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