• Rafia Shabbir

30 Examples of Bloom's Taxonomy Learning Objectives For Teachers

Updated: Aug 20, 2021

Bloom’s taxonomy is a hierarchical order of learning objectives that educators set for their students

It is widely used in education and is also branded as the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. It facilitates the teachers to achieve their teaching objectives by setting goals for the student learning and then creating assessments to observe the learning outcomes. The use of bloom’s taxonomy is widespread among educators as it helps them in:

  • Creating lesson plans, learning activities and instructional strategies based on the complexity of the subject matter

  • Curriculum mapping and designing courses

  • Creating assessments to measure the learning outcomes of the students









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History Of Bloom’s Taxonomy

Bloom’s taxonomy is named after Benjamin Bloom - an educational psychologist at the University of Chicago who chaired the committee which proposed bloom’s taxonomy in 1956. The committee proposed the following three domains of learning.

  • Cognitive: It corresponds to the mental abilities of a person. It is divided into six learning objectives which are explained below in this article in detail.

  • Affective: It involves emotional areas and growth in feelings. Like cognitive domain, this level comprises of five categories. These five categories are receiving, responding, valuing, organization and characterization.

  • Psychomotor: Psychomotor domain encompasses physical or manual skills which require practice. These skills are measured against factors such as speed, precision, distance, procedures, or techniques in execution.



Bloom’s committee originally proposed five learning levels of the cognitive process which were ranked in the order of their complexity. However, in 2001 it was revised to incorporate the 6th level. These 6 levels are used by the teachers all over the world to formulate curriculum, lesson plans, learning standards or objectives and assessments for courses.


Originally it was proposed to devise a common teaching language for educators so that they can communicate learning and assessment methods with each other. The primary goal of bloom’s taxonomy is to create a higher-level thinking and skills among students starting from the most basic level.






Six Levels Of Bloom's Taxonomy

The six levels of learning proposed by Bloom’s taxonomy are explained below along with the 30 examples of learning goals and objectives for teachers.


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1. Remember (Knowledge)

It is the lowest level of bloom’s taxonomy hierarchical model which encompasses the ability to recall the learned information. Before a student can understand a concept, he must be able to recall the information. Common teaching or learning methods used at this knowledge level are lectures, book reading, online resources, memorization and watching videos.


Examples Of Learning Objectives

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to define acceleration.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to outline various stages of design thinking.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to label different parts of the human brain.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to list various kinds of loops in javascript.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to name different parts of nervous system



2. Understand (Comprehension)

The next level is comprehension. At this stage, students are able to understand, interpret and summarize the concepts learned in the knowledge phase in their own words. The most common methods for teaching and learning at this stage are charts, graphs, discussion, reading material, and presentations.



Examples Of Learning Objectives

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to explain how sensory receptors in our brain detect stimuli.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to recognize different types of number sequences.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to explain how the heart pumps blood throughout our body.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to distinguish between mass and weight.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to discuss the factors that affect the solubility of a liquid.





3. Apply

At this stage, students are able to apply facts, ideas, and concepts into another context.


Examples Of Learning Objectives

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to compute their annual pocket money using this mathematical formula.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to use this accounting software for their annual family budget.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to forecast the annual revenue of any company using its past data.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to demonstrate how work in a diverse culture.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to show how to demonstrate emotional intelligence during an interview.


4. Analyze

At this stage, students are finally able to break down the concepts into individual parts, think critically to draw a connection between the broken parts, analyze, draw inferences and make attributions.


Examples Of Learning Objectives

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to differentiate between differential and inferential statistics.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to illustrate how DNA code translates into RNA code.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to analyze information in the marketing research.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to analyze how leaves change colors during the fall season.



5. Evaluate

At this stage, students make judgments about the concepts, defend or criticize them based on certain criteria and standards.


Examples Of Learning Objectives

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to explain which kind of medicine is better for leukemia and why?

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to defend their proposed hypotheses.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to assess the environmental impact of coal mining.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to measure the effectiveness of project-based learning.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to appraise the practice of social media advertising in business.


6. Create

This is the last level of learning in Bloom’s taxonomy. At this stage, students can demonstrate their knowledge by applying the learned concepts to create something meaningful. It could involve developing an application or part of a machine, designing a website, creating a report or a video.


Examples Of Learning Objectives

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to develop an application for the Google play store.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to create financial statements in MS Excel.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to compose the scientific name of an organism.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to come up with the innovative ideas to tackle climate change.

  • By the end of this lesson, students will be able to make their own battery charger.






180 + Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs Used By Teachers

Below are 180 plus examples of the bloom’s taxonomy action verbs which the educators can use while formulating the learning objectives for their courses.


Knowledge: order, mention, outline, illustrate, define, select, explain, match, recognize, locate, quote, list, describe, duplicate, recite, describe, tell, copy, identify, label, arrange, recollect, name, relate, recall, reproduce, state, read, state, memorize, repeat


Comprehension (Understand): review, illustrate rewrite, identify, estimate, distinguish, paraphrase, explain, explore, inquire, give examples of, discuss, summarize, restate, cite, associate, select, extend, classify, convert, express, extend, indicate, infer, contrast, defend, locate, paraphrase, predict, translate, interpret, describe




Application: change, perform, manipulate, produce, report, administer, paint, dramatize, actuate, use, demonstrate, calculate, solve, relate, complete, modify, compute, sketch, articulate, present, transfer, show, act, involve, model, prepare, teach, discover, respond, experiment, act



Analysis: differentiate, conclude, divide, inspect, distinguish, analyze, contrast, connect, relate, criticize, devise, correlate, illustrate, distill, problem-solve, break down, diagram, scrutinize, categorize, discriminate, take apart, calculate, simplify, deduce, subdivide, order, adapt, separate, explain, infer


Evaluate: revise, support, assess, argue, judge, decide, refine, re-design, pivot, evaluate defend, tabulate, select, convince, score, gauge, reframe, measure, value, estimate, prioritize, rank, appraise, plan, sort, grade, explain, criticize, test, designate, choose, evolve, analyze


Create: come up with, build, develop, design, rewrite, re-frame, summarize, frame, form, modify, imagine, generate, role-Play, make, manufacture, compose, contrive, assemble. derive, conceive, create, pivot, modify, collaborate, write, formulate, invent, set up




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